True Crime Books by Jason Lucky Morrow

Welcome to HistoricalCrimeDetective.com [Est. 2013], where you will discover forgotten crimes and criminals lost to history. This blog is the official website for true crime writer Jason Lucky Morrow, author of four books including the popular series: Famous Crimes the World Forgot, Volume I and Volume II. Please follow us on Facebook, for updates. Contact me here for questions or comments.


Archive for 'Feature Stories'

Serial Killer ‘Texas Jim’ Baker, Part Two

. Click Here to Read Part One — Or Click Here to Read All in One with Bibliography The Investigation After Baker left, the two men loosened their ropes and discovered Gaw’s body while searching for a telephone to call police. Detectives and lab supervisors were able to piece together that Gaw’s killer must be […]

Serial Killer “Texas Jim” Baker, Part One

  This is part one of a two part story that is 9,500 words long.  A all-in-one post is available here.   Author’s Note: “Texas Jim” Baker was a serial killer who used poison and pistols to murder nine men around the world between 1924 and 1929. After he was captured in February, 1930, for […]

The Case of the Make Believe Orphan, 1953

  Want to Read this Story Later on Your Tablet or other Device? Download PDF File of “The Case of the Make Believe Orphan, 1953″   Story Credit: “The Case of the Make-Believe Orphan,” by Gerry Smart, Front Page Detective, November 1955. Texas, March 1953 The boy’s words over the phone were simple, but it […]

Savage Killer Timothy McCorquodale, 1974

In Memoriam. Donna Marie Dixon, 1956 to 1974 Although it has been more than forty-years now, the memory of Donna Marie Dixon has not been erased by time. Her existence, her time with us in this world, lives on in the memory of four of her friends who wish to honor her, remember her, and […]

The Marian Baker Murder of 1950

. Originally Published: “I Had To Kill,” by George Beltz, Front Page Detective, May, 1950. Editor’s Note: Articles written for detective magazines during the 1940s, 50s and 60s often incorporated “recreated dialogue” in order to both tell the story and to advance the storyline. For readers today, this dialogue will feel contrived and trite. In […]